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‘Written with feeling’ | An Industry Now Lost, by Arthur Cole

TREMENDOUS.

What can one say, if you have ever lived in a mining community, the poems bring home to everyone the challenges these brave men and their families faced on a daily basis.

Arthur has done a wonderful job of putting into poetry the lives of those in such communities. Hopefully many miners will buy this book, read these words, and agree. Plus in doing so they will help support the charities that Arthur donates so much of his time and efforts to.

Amazon Customer, 5 out of 5 stars. Verified Purchase on Amazon.co.uk.

Poetry that tells the heartache and the true cost of mining.

This book of fifty poems about the mining industry tells the true impact it has had on mining communities past and present. I like how each poem tells a story and like one reviewer stated, they are thought provoking and emotional. This book is a fitting and moving tribute to all those mining communities, Highly recommended.

Steve, 5 out of 5 stars. Verified Purchase on Amazon.co.uk.

Written with feeling.

I love the feeling evident within the poems. Written by a man with obvious family connections to those he writes about. Highly recommended.

NW Kindle Customer, 5 out of 5 stars. Verified Purchase on Amazon.co.uk.

An Industry Now Lost: The Pride, Passion and Pain of Mining is a collection of poems on the subject of coal mining throughout the UK and other countries of the world. It mostly portrays mining disasters from Victorian times, however there are more modern disasters depicted like ‘Aberfan’ in 1966 and ‘Gleision’ in 2011. Arthur Cole is from a mining background and has seen the industry decimated in modern times.

Buy An Industry Now Lost from Amazon, Apple Books, Google Books, or from your preferred retailer: geni.us/Mining

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‘Written with feeling’ | An Industry Now Lost, by Arthur Cole

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