Dogs Don't Send Flowers

A young man comes to New York City chasing a career in the theatre and a writer, producer, or indeed any capacity. When he inherits an abandoned puppy he names Pard there starts a complicated and comedic relationship between man and dog. In this humourous collection of short stories we follow the exploits of a pooch and his owner.

SKU twi_9781912056828 Categories ,
(4 customer reviews)

£3.99£8.99

Standard UK delivery 5-7 days

Description

A young man comes to New York City chasing a career in the theatre and a writer, producer, or indeed any capacity. He earns a living by teaching drama and performing as a silent clown. When he inherits an abandoned puppy he names Pard there starts a complicated and comedic relationship between man and dog.

In this humourous collection of short stories we follow the exploits of a pooch and his owner, and their similar need for companionship, love, or just plain sex.

Additional information

Weight N/A
Pages

184

Imprint

Wordcatcher Publishing

MainBISAC

FICTION / Short Stories (single author)

PubDate

20180922

BySameAuthor

9781911265672, 9781911265610, 9781912056361

4 reviews for Dogs Don’t Send Flowers

  1. Vincent Brothers Review

    A delightful romp

  2. Wings of Icarus Journal

    A unique and unexpected piece that seems to live in its own intriguing world

  3. Sliptongue Magazine

    A great tale!

  4. Manhattan Book Review

    In Dogs Don’t Send Flowers by Gary Beck, Ken Kensington is a professor of theater who broke away from his family’s long line of pre-arranged occupations for the first two born sons. He left his distraught family and inheritance behind to make a go of it alone in New York City. Good luck found him when he obtained a well-to-do apartment, due to an error by the landlord, and he adopted a puppy from his neighbors, naming him Pard. Pard became the epitome of man’s best friend for Ken.
    Eventually, almost everything starts going right for Ken. He gets a wonderful girlfriend after many duds, his job as a professor at the theater college is on the upswing, and his “other job” as a clown along the sidewalk is still proving to be very profitable. One thing remains amiss though: Pard’s desire to “sate his appetite.”

    Beck’s book reads very smoothly, with each chapter having the option of being read independently as its own short story. The nature of each story could be seen as offensive since Beck focuses most of his attention on sex for Ken and Pard.

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