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‘Private Enterprise in Social Affairs’: 1800s Echoes from the Past | Workhouse, by Ray Noyes

In the main, workhouses were managed by boards of guardians. Initially, you had to be a landowner to run a workhouse, although this requirement was later removed. Boards of guardians frequently neglected their duties and allowed the workhouse to become a house of horrors. To take an extreme example, in Andover, the food rations had been cut so harshly that people turned to eating candles!

In rural areas, poorhouses were administered by the clergy, together prominent local figures, such as the Justice of the Peace and landed gentry. By Ray’s estimation, they generally did so honourably.

Workhouse Video Series with Ray Noyes

In this Q&A video series with Ray Noyes, we find out about his upcoming book, Workhouse, and the terrible truths he discovered while researching for it. What were the workhouses? Who lived in them? What were the harsh realities that awaited within? This is a true story about social injustice in Britain.

  1. 4 Differences Between Workhouses and Poorhouses
  2. Yes, the Workhouse Really Was as You Imagine
  3. The Shocking Truth About the Rich’s Attitude to the Poor
  4. Babies Stripped from Their Mothers at Birth!
  5. Finally, a Book Exploring the Social Causes of Workhouses
  6. Workhouse, by Ray Noyes | Ebook Publication Day
  7. Punishment Fit for the ‘Crime’ of Being Poor?
  8. Living Hell vs Care: Workhouse Meets Poorhouse
  9. ‘Private Enterprise in Social Affairs’: 1800s Echoes from the Past
  10. Surprising Legacies of the Workhouse (coming soon)
  11. Workhouse, by Ray Noyes | Print Publication Day (coming soon)

Buy Workhouse now in ebook format from your preferred retailer: geni.us/workhouse-poor

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‘Private Enterprise in Social Affairs’: 1800s Echoes from the Past | Workhouse, by Ray Noyes

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